Learning resilience as a teacher

I am currency sitting in Starbucks on a dreary Thursday trying to complete my last assignment for my PGCE. There have been three assignments I am nearly there. When I started to apply for a PGCE I would have never thought of spending my holidays findings research and then trying to compare, contrast, dress-up and create situations where they are almost sitting at a table and having a conversation. When I signed up, I thought I would be constantly changing hearts and mind towards my subject, inspiring students to become doctors, dentists and dermatologists (I’m a science teacher). Teaching completed? Not even close. Throughout my time at MSC, I have had ups and downs. When you are trying to complete portfolio task 347 and plan 15 lessons, you think, ‘what on earth am I doing?’. So I’ve made it sound like teaching is the a no-go for anyone, but that’s where you’re wrong. I have been so supported by MSC and they’ve taught me that teaching is not just a course where you get a certificate and a job well-done. It is a journey where if you surround yourself with the right people, you will learn everyday and hopefully flourish. I will never be a completed teacher by the age of 24, nor will I be at 65. During the essay writing process, I’ve surprised myself with how much I enjoy the content but also how much I’ve learnt about myself. I find teaching fascinating, exciting, stressful, the worst job and the best job all in one. If your passion is to inspire and become a role model within a classroom you are definitely in the right profession. However, you’ve got to build and harness your resilience, just as you would encourage your students to have. Have I persuaded you that you’re right for the job? Just the fact that you’ve read through this poor attempt at humour blog post is resilience enough, that’s it I’ve decided, you’re right for the job. 

 

 

 

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